Lost Past, Lost Future

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Lost Past, Lost Future

Photo by Abdel Rahman Abu Baker from Pexels

Photo by Abdel Rahman Abu Baker from Pexels

Photo by Abdel Rahman Abu Baker from Pexels

Liliana Owen, Journalist

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The full moon lights the walkway to my home as I quietly but quickly make my way to the front door. All the lights are off, which is normal enough in my house at midnight, but something doesn’t quite feel right. Or maybe it’s just the full moon in the sky? I’m a rather superstitious person.

I open the door and step inside. The moonlight does not seep through the thick curtains, and in the pitch blackness, I see nothing. I flip the switch and pull off my shoes, giving my tired feet a break.

Then I notice the person standing in the doorway between the living room and the dining room. I jump and frown. How did he get there? Who let him in?

“I don’t need anyone to let me in,” he says stiffly. I nod and facepalm for forgetting he could read my thoughts.

“It’s not your fault you forgot,” he says.

I nod slowly as I try to accustom myself to this ability I had forgotten my long-time lost friend had.

He grins at me and said, “I wasn’t really lost, you know.”

“You weren’t?” I say aloud, and I am shocked by how much my voice quavers.

He nods. “I was lost to you, but not to myself. I knew where I was. Still do, as a matter of fact.” He chuckles, and I have to grin too. I had forgotten his sense of humor. It could, at times, be annoying.

“Where were you?” I ask.

“I got caught in a time warp and ended up in ancient Rome.”

I frown at him. “Really?”

“I’ve never lied, Emma. Never.”

I nod slowly. That was one part of his character I had not forgotten: his unending and complete honesty with everyone. But still: time warps? Caught in ancient Rome?

“You really don’t remember any of it, do you?” he asks.

I shrug. How can I answer that?

“I can’t believe it,” he says as he begins pacing the room. “You helped me discover them! If I had done it on my own, I never would have succeeded. You had the magic that let us filter through the air, the magic that let us sense when something wasn’t quite right, the magic that allowed us to see that which technically didn’t even exist!”

I have no memories of that as well.

He frowns, then shakes his head. “I really needed you to remember all of that. Because I am in really big trouble and only you can help me.”

“But how can I? I have no magic, no gifts, no superpowers.”

His frown increases as he says, “Emma. Think. Have you been having nightmares about world destruction?”

I warily nod my head. Yes, every night, I want to say, but it takes courage to admit it, courage which I don’t have.

“How does it turn out? How do they stop it?” he asks softly.

“Why is this so important?”

“Emma!” he half shouts. “You had been an oracle of sorts, okay? And guess what, you got most of your stuff from dreams. And I really need guidance right now because I accidentally angered the Roman emperor, ripped the time warp, and ruined the world.”

“What did you do?” I ask.

“I accidentally let the Roman army into our modern world, and nobody can see them but you and me, and they’re going around killing everybody!”

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